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Old 11-18-2015, 09:59 PM
whiskeyjob whiskeyjob is offline
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Default Would you drink straight from charred oak??!!

Hi guys, i am new here. Can you please help - what do you think about tasting whiskey straight from a charred oak? I recently came upon a product - wooden tumbler with charred interior. Authors claim that it is made like original oak barrels and will reveal whiskey flavors like no glass tumbler ever could. I am considering to get one and wanted to hear some other opinions.

You can view it here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...new-tasting-ex

Last edited by Islay Peat; 11-19-2015 at 08:59 AM. Reason: spelling in title
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Old 11-19-2015, 09:04 AM
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Islay Peat Islay Peat is online now
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I'd be willing to give it a try if handed one but remember that the benefits gained from contact with charred oak are measured in months at the least and more commonly in years. I'd expect no benefit other than black char on your lips afterwards.

If you like really good whiskies and are looking for a glass made specially for them try looking at getting a set of Glencairn whisky glasses from Amazon.
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Old 11-19-2015, 01:28 PM
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Call me a skeptic...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Islay Peat View Post
remember that the benefits gained from contact with charred oak are measured in months at the least and more commonly in years.
^^^This^^^

Granted, my knowledge of whisky, barrels, etc. is limited, but the understanding I have is, as Islay Peat stated, that it takes a LONG time for the charred oak to work its magic.

Then there is the issue of re-using the glass, er, wood. If the tumbler does absorb a little whisky from the pour the first time it's used, even trace amounts, what happens on the next and subsequent pours? If the oak tumbler had a noticeable effect the first time or two it was used, it seems to me that effect would diminish with each use, i.e. a very limited life cycle for the tumbler.

I'll stick to my Glencairn glass, or a small snifter. May give a Norlan glass a try someday.
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Old 11-19-2015, 03:00 PM
whiskeyjob whiskeyjob is offline
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Thanks for your answers.
I actually asked about those things to tumbler creators. From what they claim the charr is very light and it would not directly change the taste. They said that it would make a very pleasant aroma which also makes the tasting more enjoyable.
At this point they almost convinced me to try it out. I am a bit confused but i have a plenty of time to consider it
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Old 11-19-2015, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiskeyjob View Post
Thanks for your answers.
I actually asked about those things to tumbler creators. From what they claim the charr is very light and it would not directly change the taste. They said that it would make a very pleasant aroma which also makes the tasting more enjoyable.
At this point they almost convinced me to try it out. I am a bit confused but i have a plenty of time to consider it
I've surely spent far more money than the (probable) cost of that oak tumbler on things that ended up being money poorly spent. Fortunately, not too many times in my almost 60 years. There was always something to learn from the experience, even if it was a hard lesson.

The aroma effect you mentioned would further dissuade me. I want to smell the whisky in the glass, not the glass itself.

But hey, don't let the musings of a curmudgeonly old fart discourage you. If you're that curious about the thing, give it a go.
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Old 11-20-2015, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john_b View Post
I want to smell the whisky in the glass, not the glass itself.
LOL! That's true for me too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiskeyjob View Post
They said that it would make a very pleasant aroma which also makes the tasting more enjoyable.
At this point they almost convinced me to try it out.
Like John said, if you want to give it a go and it's not too expensive then what the heck.

I've made many an expensive mistake and yet still been happy in the end, and many more of the inexpensive mistakes.

If you do get one post up here and let us know what you think of them.
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Old 01-07-2016, 04:25 AM
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Son-o'-the-Sod(?) Son-o'-the-Sod(?) is offline
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The ideal scenario would be to report to the distillery of your choice with the tools appropriate to the task, tap a hole in a barrel/cask, and imbibe to your heart's content! (-kidding, but I add to the posts above). Generally you're better off with properly aged stuff. Then there's the option of buying white spirit and aging it yourself in the (usually) mini-sized barrels provided by the distillery/retailer, if it's legal to do so where you live. What sort of experience are you looking for?
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Old 03-08-2016, 06:43 AM
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araprado613 araprado613 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiskeyjob View Post
Thanks for your answers.
I actually asked about those things to tumbler creators. From what they claim the charr is very light and it would not directly change the taste. They said that it would make a very pleasant aroma which also makes the tasting more enjoyable.
At this point they almost convinced me to try it out. I am a bit confused but i have a plenty of time to consider it
I think you should give it a shot. That's the only way you'll know of it'll be good or not, right? If it were me, I would give it a go. It's not everyday you get to try that.
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