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  #1  
Old 06-25-2013, 06:11 AM
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Default Advice for the Newbies

Hey All,
I thought this would this be a great thread for some of the more seasoned veterans to provide tips for those new to whisky. Tips can include dram suggestions, nosing tips, palate awareness, and much more. Come on guys, lets help the way we wish we got help when we were starting!
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  #2  
Old 06-25-2013, 06:19 AM
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Default Importance of the Nose

My advice is something many of us take for granted as already knowing. The sense of smell plays a huge part in the tastes we perceive. That said, my advice is to encourage the use of a proper nosing glass for sampling whisky. I use a glencairn glass and I am still amazed at the nuances it provides compared to a regular glass or tumbler. It's like night and day.

Don't rush into tasting until you've dissected all that the whisky can offer through nosing. It's worth the wait.
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Old 06-25-2013, 09:41 PM
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Start easy with something like Tomintoul not Laphroaig. I have a friend that is a whisky lover but since I started him on Laphroaig he will still not drink it. Pity da fool.
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Old 06-26-2013, 09:00 PM
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I agree that a proper glass is essential to getting the most out of your whisky experience. I have both Reidel and Glencairn nosing/tasting glasses, but I prefer the Glencairn. It's amazing how a good glass can change both the nose and taste of whisky.
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Old 06-27-2013, 08:28 AM
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A big +1 on all the mentions of Glencairn glasses, and I think it even more important to have the right mind-set when having a sip. Always best to go through the all important foreplay of sniffing and getting fully acquainted with the dram of the moment before having the first taste.

Don't hurry.
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Old 06-27-2013, 07:41 PM
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Yes i love the Glencairn glass the best too but i also really like the high stem tasting glasses like this one.

Last edited by michael; 01-03-2014 at 05:51 AM.
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Old 06-28-2013, 01:19 AM
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Thanks all for the comments. I hope this thread catches on. It has great potential. Please feel free to add more advice...
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Old 06-28-2013, 06:15 PM
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I recently bought Jim Murray's Whisky Bible, and tried his suggested tasting method. A couple of things he recommends that seemed to enhance my experience:

1. Have some black coffee or semi-sweet chocolate prior to tasting to cleanse your palate.

2. Cup the glass in one hand to warm the whisky while covering the glass with the other to trap the aromas. Remove your hand as you bring the glass to your nose (be careful, some stronger whiskies can really give you a snort!)

3. Disregard your first sip, as this is a primer for your palate. Wash the whisky around your mouth to cover all your tastebuds as different parts of your tongue pick up different flavors.

He has a whole method he describes, but the above did make a difference for me. I also recommend not trying too many in one sitting, and also saving the smoky/peaty Islays for last as the heavy flavors can overwhelm your palate and not allow you to appreciate a milder whisy.
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Old 06-28-2013, 09:53 PM
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Great advice. Unfortunately it is my wallet that prevents me from sampling too many whiskies in one sitting, not my palate.

Even though this is a single malt forum, don't be afraid to try quality blended scotch. It is a great way to familiarize yourself with flavors and nuances at a lower price. Not to mention, it's a lot easier to find a Johnnie Walker Black in the bar than most obscure single malts you've been wanting to try.
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Old 06-30-2013, 06:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gunnermcgee View Post
1. Have some black coffee or semi-sweet chocolate prior to tasting to cleanse your palate.

2. Cup the glass in one hand to warm the whisky while covering the glass with the other to trap the aromas. Remove your hand as you bring the glass to your nose (be careful, some stronger whiskies can really give you a snort!)

3. Disregard your first sip, as this is a primer for your palate. Wash the whisky around your mouth to cover all your tastebuds as different parts of your tongue pick up different flavors.

I also recommend not trying too many in one sitting, and also saving the smoky/peaty Islays for last as the heavy flavors can overwhelm your palate and not allow you to appreciate a milder whisky.
Great primer that I wish I'd seen when I first got interested in whisky and I'd just add that before trying a new whisky, particularly a strong Islay as an example, the first time drinker has a much better chance of liking it, even if it's their first whisky ever, if they'll do nothing but nosing until their senses have gotten used to it. Take your time is the important thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wallagm View Post
Even though this is a single malt forum, don't be afraid to try quality blended scotch. It is a great way to familiarize yourself with flavors and nuances at a lower price. Not to mention, it's a lot easier to find a Johnnie Walker Black in the bar than most obscure single malts you've been wanting to try.
Some of my favorite blends are better for me than many of the single malts I've had. Particularly have a soft spot for Johnnie Walker Green, Taketsuru 17 and Hibiki 12.
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  #11  
Old 07-01-2013, 04:33 AM
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Thanks for the confirmation Islay Peat. I'm enjoying a JW Green right now! Found it in Florida last week and its complexity is great for the nose... and taste buds
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Old 07-02-2013, 08:55 AM
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You gotta go with your heart. 41 years ago I was in love with Johnnie Walker Black. Now Ardbeg rings the bell. You just have to sample a bunch and pay attention to what the stuff does to your senses.
There is so much variety and complexity.
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Old 07-02-2013, 07:27 PM
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Very good not to give up on a single brand until you've sampled more than one of their line. I didn't like the JW Black at all, but like the Double Black, and especially the Green. Found a great price on the Green for just over $50 yesterday.
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  #14  
Old 07-26-2013, 03:35 AM
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Great suggestions, especially those regarding the Glencairn glass. Just ordered some.
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  #15  
Old 07-26-2013, 04:36 AM
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You won't regret the glass purchases. I can't say enough good things about them.

Any more great advice out there from our experts?
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Old 07-27-2013, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wallagm View Post
Any more great advice out there from our experts?
I'm no expert but I have found that I get the best value and experience when I shop using the following criteria:

1. I look for IB expressions from the lesser know distilleries.
2. I look for cask strength.
3. I look for NCF and no E150a added.

I have stumbled on some stunners at great values over the years using these criteria.

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Old 07-27-2013, 10:40 PM
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I'm with you on 2 of those points;

I always try to buy stuff that is not chill-filtered and not coloured.

And I never really (well, only a few exceptions) buy stuff at 40% - i feel it's a cop out from the distillery with little thought being put it to the end result so they can churn out more whisky to the mass market.


The only thing with IB stuff, some of it is cracking but there are rotters out there too. It's like playing with dynamite, you never know what you're going to get and it may blow up.

I picked up a BBR bottling of a 37yo Glen Grant, full cask strength NCF and natural colour for 135. You try to find a 37yo for that price from an OB! .....but I new it was good as it was highly rated by several independant "experts"....so IB's are good, but make sure you do your homework.
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  #18  
Old 07-28-2013, 05:28 AM
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Yeah I am weary of Independent bottlings. I bottle a 14yr old Ben Nevis that was from a Independent I didn't care for it at all. I have shared a Ben Nevis before and knew that the bottle I bought didn't taste close to the one I bought, so I went and talk to the shop that was selling the Independent Bottlings and they told me the Bottler like to RE-cask them and add their own twist to make it more they style. Which is fine but something I kinda stay away now.

Another tip for newbs is don't be scared to add water to your dram. A few drops will really open up some whiskys and anything over 50% really should have a water added to it, to bring it down a little bit and take the nip off it. I understand that some say NO WAY but if you new to scotch and are trying to explore everything, tend I say it something worth a try. A few drop, maybe a teaspoon even if its really high ABV. Some whiskys will breakdown and fade quick with water(no doubt) but some will take water and really open up and shine. You never know to you try.
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Old 07-29-2013, 12:37 AM
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Well said about adding water, Ratman. It's amazing what a few drops can do. I think some people believe adding water is less manly or pure. This is nonsense. Just remember, it's easier to drown as whisky than you think. You can always add more water but you can never take it back!
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Old 07-30-2013, 06:29 AM
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Can't agree enough about the Glencairn glasses, especially the plain version. I've got the cut crystal but all my friends bought the plain ones and I'm planning on getting some too.

Wallagm is spot on regarding the few drops of water, and all advice driven from a perspective of absolutes is to be treated with caution, whether it be water, chill-filtration or anything else.

The final decision needs to be your nose and palate.
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  #21  
Old 07-30-2013, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islay Peat View Post
...all advice driven from a perspective of absolutes is to be treated with caution, whether it be water, chill-filtration or anything else.

The final decision needs to be your nose and palate.
Best advice in the whole thread.
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  #22  
Old 07-30-2013, 11:29 PM
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Tip of the day: no matter how much you try and beg, the age statement is not also a price tag!

I'm kidding, of course, but it does make a point. An older and more expensive whisky is not always a better whisky.
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  #23  
Old 08-04-2013, 04:30 AM
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EDIT- Both Glasses are Real. One ... is a Just a Older Style of the Glass and One ... is The Newer Style of the Glass but both a 100%REAL.Sorry[/B]

Last edited by Islay Peat; 12-20-2013 at 07:20 AM. Reason: cleaned up for readability
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  #24  
Old 08-04-2013, 07:00 AM
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Thanks for the post, Ratman. I had no idea that counterfeits existed for these glasses (especially for the $8 models).
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  #25  
Old 08-05-2013, 02:27 AM
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Default Fake Glencairn Glasses?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post
A few pics on how to spot the FAKE Glencairn Glass.
As North America's largest Glencairn retailer, I must respectfully disagree with RATMAN on his assumption and comparison of the Glencairn glasses. He states that the one on the left is a FAKE and the one on the right is REAL.

BOTH glasses are REAL. The one on the left is the OLD STYLE Glencairn that was the SODA / LIME composition ( original composition that Raymond Davidson released ), which was thicker and heavier, and was phased out a few years ago. The etching on the bottom was changed when the one on the right was released; the etching was made bolder on the newer one to immediately distinguish the old from the new. The Glencairn on the right is LEAD FREE composition and much lighter.

Both are REAL. I hope this clears up the confusion.
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Last edited by Islay Peat; 12-20-2013 at 07:22 AM. Reason: removed non-existant material from quote
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:32 AM
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Quote:
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As North America's largest Glencairn retailer, I must respectively disagree with RATMAN on his assumption and comparison of the Glencairn glasses. He states that the one on the left is a FAKE and the one on the right is REAL.

BOTH glasses are REAL. The one on the left is the OLD STYLE Glencairn that was the SODA / LIME composition ( original composition that Raymond Davidson released ), which was thicker and heavier, and was phased out a few years ago. The etching on the bottom was changed when the one on the right was released; the etching was made bolder on the newer one to immediately distinguish the old from the new. The Glencairn on the right is LEAD FREE composition and much lighter.

Both are REAL. I hope this clears up the confusion.
Thanks for the info. Me and a shop owner here in town thought it was fake cause he had never seen one like that before and just thought it fake cause of it being so heavy. Thanks for clearing that up. Sorry about any mis-information i spreaded, I didn't know. I will edit my other post here in a min.

Thanks again.

Last edited by Ratman; 08-05-2013 at 03:50 AM.
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:53 AM
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Since we are talking about the glass you drink whisky out of, another good thing to do with the glass is to let it sit over night and smell it the next day. After you finish your dram, don't wash out the glass. just cover it with something and the next day smell it. It gives off a great smell off the whisky you were drinking.
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Old 08-05-2013, 06:40 AM
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Are the current Glencairns being made in Germany?
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Old 08-05-2013, 06:47 AM
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Nice suggestions. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 08-05-2013, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
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Are the current Glencairns being made in Germany?
Yes, the newer ones are made in Germany. The older version was produced in France.
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  #31  
Old 08-07-2013, 01:15 AM
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My first Glencairn came from Value Village and was engraved with the Glen Breton labeling. It's the older variety and I still enjoy having it, always in my guitar case.

My cut crystal Glencairn's are much nicer, but still obviously kin to their predecessor and they all see plenty of usage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post
Since we are talking about the glass you drink whisky out of, another good thing to do with the glass is to let it sit over night and smell it the next day. After you finish your dram, don't wash out the glass. just cover it with something and the next day smell it. It gives off a great smell off the whisky you were drinking.
I love doing this, but the one drink I love that doesn't fare well over time is Laphroaig, and while I'll usually finish any part of a dram that sat overnight, I toss it if it was Laphroaig.
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Old 08-08-2013, 04:15 AM
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Here is a question for you all:

Started a few weeks back with LGVN 16. My B-in-L must have thought that was funny to start me that way. I liked it. Bought a Glenfiddich 12 to get a second bottle going. LAME! Is the older GLFD stuff any better than that or does my appreciation for the Ardbeg and LGVN mean I should lean to something completely different?

LGVN 16 --> GLFDCH 12 --> ARBDG 10 and I have a bottle of Dalwhinnie 15 and Aberlour A'Bunadh waiting to be opened.

Another question...

How many bottles do you open at a time? Should I work through 1 or 2 to get used to them, or is switching between 3/4 ok to compare and get used to the differences.

BD
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Old 08-08-2013, 04:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BroncoBrian View Post
Here is a question for you all:

Started a few weeks back with LGVN 16. My B-in-L must have thought that was funny to start me that way. I liked it. Bought a Glenfiddich 12 to get a second bottle going. LAME! Is the older GLFD stuff any better than that or does my appreciation for the Ardbeg and LGVN mean I should lean to something completely different?

LGVN 16 --> GLFDCH 12 --> ARBDG 10 and I have a bottle of Dalwhinnie 15 and Aberlour A'Bunadh waiting to be opened.

Another question...

How many bottles do you open at a time? Should I work through 1 or 2 to get used to them, or is switching between 3/4 ok to compare and get used to the differences.

BD
There is no way to say how you'll feel about older glenfiddichs until you try them. That said, I think your taste for Ardbeg and Lagavulin may lead you to try something like Highland Park or another islay, like Bunnahabhain or Laphroaig. Find out what you like about Lagavulin and Ardbeg and then review tasting notes to find other malts with similar characteristics.

To answer your other question, there is no harm in having a few bottles open at a time. In my experience, changes in the whisky occur faster when the bottle contains more air than whisky. This was especially evident in my bottle of Balvenie Doublewood. Good luck in your journey and keep us updated!
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Old 08-11-2013, 08:34 PM
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Quote:
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How many bottles do you open at a time? Should I work through 1 or 2 to get used to them, or is switching between 3/4 ok to compare and get used to the differences.
I've got most of my bottles open and some have been so for over half a year with no reduction in enjoyment quality!
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Old 08-12-2013, 07:40 AM
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A word of caution:
I used to think fine French brandy was good... this whisky business has the potential to be absolutely addictive.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:57 PM
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So far everything is coming short of the Lagavulin. Arbeg 10 has a fishiness or something unpleasant to it. Not sure. Glenfiddich 12 was boring.

I have a bottle of Dalwhinnie and Aberlour to try and am excited about both.
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:23 PM
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Arbeg 10 has a fishiness or something unpleasant to it.
That's the way I feel about Laphroaig 10. If anything the Ardie 10 lacks complexity and a full flavored body although the kick azz peat is there. I find it to be a very clean tasting, quality offering though.
Been doing some mixing with it lately and am quite pleased with the results.
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Old 08-13-2013, 02:16 AM
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I love all three of the southern Islay potions and like many food items or types of scenery I enjoy, cannot place them on a side-by-side comparison chart.

For myself at least, I enjoy their individual aspects and find myself thankful that so many different formulas exist to allow a flavor for every moment.

While I'd find it possibly easiest to have a bottle of Ardbeg 10 as my only available drink, I'd definitely miss the Lagavulin 16 and Laphroaig 10 if they weren't there for those times when they fit my mood a bit more perfectly.
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Old 08-13-2013, 05:11 PM
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...I enjoy their individual aspects and find myself thankful that so many different formulas exist to allow a flavor for every moment.
Well said. That is how I feel about the half-dozen Speysides and Highlanders on my "faves list".
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Old 08-13-2013, 06:47 PM
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Well said. That is how I feel about the half-dozen Speysides and Highlanders on my "faves list".
After liking the Glenfiddich
Special Old Reserve so much, I'm anxious to see what offers a flavour profile closest to it, and as such have been eyeing picking up a bottle of Glenfiddich 15.

It seems that many strongly flavored Islay fans don't care so much for the softer flavors, but I like both soft and strong flavors fairly equally, as long as they taste good to me and need to find some enjoyable Speysides before my one bottle of Special Old Reserve runs out.
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Old 08-13-2013, 08:54 PM
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Hey Bronco,

Disclaimer: By no means am I an expert, but went through quite a few bottles last winter (and currently stocking up for this winter).

I, like you, love the Laga 16, I think I've gone through three bottles of it since I started on single malts and will always have a spot in my cabinet. Try the Bowmore 15 Darkest. It's got all of the characteristics of an Islay, but something about being finished in a sherry cask gives it a different dimension. Though it definitely isn't as smokey/peaty as the Laga, I still enjoyed it.

This is a great thread btw!

Last edited by jscotch; 08-13-2013 at 09:59 PM.
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Old 12-05-2013, 04:33 AM
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Quote:
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Hey Bronco,

Disclaimer: By no means am I an expert, but went through quite a few bottles last winter (and currently stocking up for this winter).

I, like you, love the Laga 16, I think I've gone through three bottles of it since I started on single malts and will always have a spot in my cabinet. Try the Bowmore 15 Darkest. It's got all of the characteristics of an Islay, but something about being finished in a sherry cask gives it a different dimension. Though it definitely isn't as smokey/peaty as the Laga, I still enjoyed it.

This is a great thread btw!
JSCOTCH - Thanks for the suggestion.

Update: it has been a few months and I have made some progress. I bought another Lag16 and it was not nearly as good as the bottle I had earlier. The early bottle was dusty, likely sat in the store for months or more. Not sure if the newer bottles lack something?

The Aberlour A'bunadh is amazing. Took a few poors to calm down some but I really like it. The Dalwhinnie 15 was also g=very good. Simpler and laid back but excellent.

My latest pet (You are all right, this is addicting!) is The Laddie 10. Seems like less of a punch in the face compared to ardbeg and lgvn, but very good quality and the smokiness is sufficient. The honey finish is surprisingly strong.

Anyone else suffering from recent Lagavulin 16 blues?

BD
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Old 12-05-2013, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Update: it has been a few months and I have made some progress. I bought another Lag16 and it was not nearly as good as the bottle I had earlier. The early bottle was dusty, likely sat in the store for months or more. Not sure if the newer bottles lack something?
Lagavulin 16 is known to vary between batches but before you dismiss your newest bottle give it some time to open up. Your last sips from the previous bottle had a lot of oxygen to change or "open up" its flavor. The new bottle has not had this happen yet.
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Old 12-05-2013, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by BroncoBrian View Post
My latest pet (You are all right, this is addicting!) is The Laddie 10. Seems like less of a punch in the face compared to ardbeg and lgvn, but very good quality and the smokiness is sufficient. The honey finish is surprisingly strong.

Anyone else suffering from recent Lagavulin 16 blues?
I'll be trying as many of the Bruichladdich lineup as possible soon and your description sounds like I may find myself liking it.

My most recent Lagavulin 16 purchase matches up with your experience, and while I still find it enjoyable, it falls short of the Lagavulin heaven I'd come to expect.
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Old 12-15-2013, 05:17 AM
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Just sitting down to Christmas shop at my favorite store, amazon.

Decided to pour 2 tonight for a quick head to head.

Highland Park 12 vs Bruichladdich The Laddie 10.

I will say... the Highland Park does not stand a chance! The Laddie is a winner by a lot more than the extra $10 bucks for the bottle. Just incredible for the money.

I did get another bottle of Laga 16. It is still a beast and with any better experience than the last bottle, should still be a favorite.
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Old 12-15-2013, 12:01 PM
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I had the Laddie 10 last night and loved it. Definitely a winner in my book.
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Old 12-16-2013, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Islay Peat View Post
I had the Laddie 10 last night and loved it. Definitely a winner in my book.
Great Islay Peat, glad you tried it. What a fun whisky and easy to enjoy. The finish can be a surprise. It feel like the honey finish can wait 10 minutes and then slap you in the tongue when you don't expect it.

1/2 way through my bottle. It has opened up a little more, but certainly not enough to change negatively. I expect it to be able to stay in the cabinet for a while with no loss in quality.
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Old 12-16-2013, 08:06 PM
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Great Islay Peat, glad you tried it. What a fun whisky and easy to enjoy. The finish can be a surprise. It feel like the honey finish can wait 10 minutes and then slap you in the tongue when you don't expect it.

1/2 way through my bottle. It has opened up a little more, but certainly not enough to change negatively. I expect it to be able to stay in the cabinet for a while with no loss in quality.
I wish I could try more of both the Bruichladdich and Bunnahabhain, which I tried side by side, but they don't have anything else from those two distilleries.

A couple others I've grown a newfound interest in are anCnoc and Longmorn, which gave a somewhat similar experience as the Glenfiddich Special Old Reserve I'd been searching for.
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Old 12-17-2013, 01:06 PM
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Default I am a newbie

Hi, I am gathering much information from all of you. I was recently at a - The Glenlivet - Guardians tasting get-together and the glass they were using was like a stemless wine glass. Now I am guessing it was made specifically for them, but it was vastly different from the glasses you are discussing here. Any thoughts?
I have a fantastic time tasting 3 of their whiskies, and I am a huge fan of the 12 and 15, not so much the 18...
I am trying to find thru this forum, some people who live in NJ so I can learn more and make some friends and share a dram or 2 with them. I have a bottle of Balvenie 17 Peat cask I am dying to open, but would very much like to share.

I also just discovered yesterday, the local restaurant close to my house, carries a fantastic line of scotches. Balvenie, Jura, Glenmorangie, Glenlivet, etc. This may be my new hangout.
OK, it is snowing, and I may be in the basement later for a dram or 2.
Thanks for tolerating my drivel.
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  #50  
Old 12-17-2013, 06:51 PM
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The place I go to for tasting always has the stemmed glasses and I like them quite a bit. But I love the Glencairns and it would really be just a personal choice as to which you like better, as they're both designed with nosing whisky in mind.

Wish I was close enough to try the Balvenie with you - I'd even bring the glasses!
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Old 01-03-2014, 04:50 AM
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Here's another vote for adding a splash of water. While I love my scotch "neat," the water really does open up the flavors. I usually sample straight, then add a splash and sample again. I've heard this is the way they drink it in Scotland. I might add some ice to experiment, but really haven't found a decent scotch I like on the rocks.

On the stemless wine glass: I actually got a stemless wine glass for my single malts. I like it better than the Glencairn and mine is German crystal. It's almost like holding the dram directly in your hand.

Last edited by Ziggy925; 01-13-2014 at 01:17 AM.
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  #52  
Old 01-07-2014, 11:04 PM
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Default NooB advice...from a fellow NooB

After a 10 year break up from alcohol, I am happy to say we've recently been reunited. Our first date was 12/20/13 with a bottle of Remy Martin XO Cognac. Next was a bottle of Camus XO then a bottle of Blanton's and Buffalo Trace (Bourbons). I quickly found that I would not/could not drink XO cognac on a daily basis and the Bourbons were too sweet and heavy for me to be dailys.

Then I was turned on to The Balvenie 17 year double wood (which I drained on New Years with an old friend). Drinking that bottle was like blood to a shark. "Hi, my name is Ryan and I'm hooked on Scotch."

I've since purchased:
- Balvenie - 14 year (Caribbean Cask)
- Balvenie - 21 year (Port wood)
- Ben Riach - 12 year
- Kilchoman Machir Bay - 2013 edition; No Age statement

In addition to that, I've sampled the Glenfiddich 18, Lagavulin 16, Laphroaig 10 and the Aberlour set your belly on fire something or other. I believe all are single malts, but I will be trying some blends in the near future, maybe I'll try Johnny Walker's line up (Let the berating begin

The local market for the single malts I've had range from Mid $40 (Ben Riach) to just barely scratching $200 (Balvenie port wood) with most being in the $60-$70 range. I'm not going to get into my tasting notes, as my option would be worth what you are paying to read this. However, I do feel that I have some knowledge to share after only 19 days of drinking scotch.

My Advice from one NooB to another - go out and try as much as you can try without over thinking the complexity of the alcohol. If you find yourself asking why you are drinking this crappy alcohol, then move on to something else. Consider that bottle a sunk cost and is only a mere few dollars towards a lifetime of Whisky education. If you find your subconscious noting different pleasantries as you wade to the bottom of the glass, then that's a BINGO!

Some booze merchants may have a spirit buyer that specializes in Whisky. Tell them you are a noob and they will give you more information than you can digest. They get a hundred customers walking through the store on a daily basis, who think they know everything about booze and only a handful that are willing to stand up and ask for a lesson. Take the lesson, these guys know more about the whisky market than most.

Keep a variety of different whiskys you like at home. I love eating burgers, but it's nice to have a steak or a pork chop every now and then. Some days I want real smokey and peaty, so I reach for the Kilchoman (but will be Lagavulin 16 in the future). Most days, I find myself gravitating towards the double wood Balvenie. I'll be getting the Glenfiddich 18 next to see if I can't bring my daily price point whisky down a bit without sacrificing the pleasure of drinking.

You can get into smells, temperature, whisky stones and gadgetry, cask strength, on the rocks, neat, blah blah blah blah. But keep in mind, that as a Noob, nobody is asking that you to be an authority on Whisky, so there is no need to try to call out the hints of black cherry and spice in the way back of your olfactory sense. All that will come one day, maybe. And if it doesn't, then just keep enjoying whats in your hand and know that you may never become "That guy".

Sorry for the long winded reply...I've got lots to say after 19 days

Last edited by Islay Peat; 01-16-2014 at 10:34 AM. Reason: *language*
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  #53  
Old 01-16-2014, 10:38 AM
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Great post Jiggity and I think you easily surpassed many members who have been here much longer in volume of content in just this one post.

If you're liking the DoubleWood, you're already onto one of the scotch worlds favorite drinks.
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